Richard E. Wackrow / Empiricist Press.com

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Richard E. Wackrow Home Page

     

Why Blasphemy?

In America, one is expected to smile deferentially while listening to the nonsense parroted by the religious: that the Ten Commandments are the basis of morality, that all religious people mean well, and that you can’t be good without God.
     The rules of “polite society” also dictate that one should not question the content, logic and instructions of the holy books. And further — so as not to offend the delicate sensibilities of the publicly pious — the nonreligious are obliged to pretend that they too have an imaginary friend who listens to their prayers.
     Well, we shouldn’t do that anymore. No one has the right not to be offended — especially when his or her alleged moral code is itself offensive.
     The number of people who have abandoned religion for reason is growing, and they are building a community based on a fundamental respect for all people that is founded on a self-evident moral imperative that predates every religious doctrine.
     It is the duty of the nonreligious to confront theobabble head-on. This book dissects and debunks religious malarkey one fantasy at a time: that a god created the universe and takes an active role in its operation; that his “only begotten son” Jesus walked and preached on this earth; that people of all religions can “coexist”; and that atheists are inherently evil. This book further demonstrates that those who follow the dictates of their faith most fervently pose the greatest menace to civilized society.
     Verily I say unto you: The abandonment of religion will make the world a happier place. People are better without God. And it is the moral duty of the nonbeliever to hasten religion’s demise through an uncompromised and well-informed blasphemy.

Buy Beginner’s Guide to Blasphemy now — before it’s banned in the name of religious freedom:
     Amazon Kindle
     Amazon paperback
     Lulu eBook (ePub)
     Lulu paperback
     Barnes & Noble paperback & NOOK
     Amazon, both my books
     And at other online retailers and your favorite bookstore

Read my columns on Daily Kos:
     How the Election of Donald Trump Defined True Christianity
     Why are the Religious Entitled to Special Treatment?
     Itís Time to Give Blasphemy the Respect it Deserves
     Better Without God
     ‘Tis the Season for Maligning Atheists
     In Search of Jesus
     Welcome to the War on Christmas, Year 59
     Why Are Atheists Excluded from the ‘COEXIST’ Club?
     Nothing Fails Like Prayer. Or Does it?
     Are Religion and Science Compatible?
     Theodicy: Making Excuses for God
     Is Secular Humanism Really a ‘Religion’?
     ‘Religious Freedom’: A Euphemism for Our Times

About Richard E. Wackrow

Thank you for visiting my website.
     I wrote the books Beginner’s Guide to Blasphemy (2016) and Who’s Winning the War on Terror (2012), and I am the former president of the Flathead Area Secular Humanist Association in Northwest Montana.
     Who’s Winning the War on Terror is an empirical examination of America’s overreaction to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the counterterrorism-industrial complex that arose as a result.
     Since the book, I have written several magazine articles and newspaper columns about various facets of the war on terror — such as the junk science that foments Americans’ fears of another deadly terrorist attack, the consummate fecklessness of airport security, and the government waste, pork-barreling and xenophobia that characterize America’s war against a tactic. In 2012-2014, I had a modest speaking schedule based on those themes.
     My preretirement credentials include serving as a reporter and editor for newspapers in several markets, as well as writing for the Dallas Morning News, Entrepreneur magazine and other major publications.




   
   
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